Tag Archives: C#

Creating an ecosystem with Continuous Integration, Installer and Deployments for a WPF / UWP application

I’ve been developing Windows desktop applications for many years now, and the operations behind the development process always fascinated me. I mean matters like issues tracking, build machine, installer and deployments. Everything  that involves in a developing a successful project, that’s not directly writing code.

In recent years buzz words like Continuous Integration and Devops popped up into consciousness, which partly describe this process.

I’m going to write here about the tools and technology stacks we have to choose and implement to create a successful ecosystem for your project.

The Goal

In between buzz words, it’s a bit hard to understand what is continuous integration and what exactly we are trying to achieve.

One way of defining it is that continuous integration means to have an automated work flow, in which every time a developer checks in code, it will compile and build on a dedicated server. This dedicated server will also run tests and if the build fails, or if at least one of the tests fail, the check-in will be rejected.

Now let’s go a bit further and think about Deployment. By that, I mean the way you deliver your software to the customer. Let’s assume for now, you want to give him a setup.exe, which he can run on his PC and install the program.

Our dedicated CI server should  also produce such a setup.exe file and even upload this file to some other server dedicated to published versions that the customer can download and install.

Out CI server is also there for the QA department, which needs to get product versions, test them, open bugs and get new versions with fixed bugs.

Part of this process which I described is called Continuous Integration. But, I also want to talk about the Deployment part which is a close cousin of the continuous integration and they both compose the ecosystem of the development process.

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Visual Studio 2017 Extension development tutorial, Part 3: Add to context menu, Get selected code

In part 2 of the tutorial we created a simple VS extension with a single Menu item.

The extension will eventually be able to add code documentation in a separate file (.cs.cdocs) and view it in a nice Heads-Up display. The tutorial explains every step of the way to build such an extension.

For starters, we need the ability to select a piece of code and add documentation, which is what we’ll be doing here.

We’re going to add a new Menu item to the code editor’s context menu. When invoked, the extension will find the selected text and its Span (From where to where). Then, it’s just a matter of showing a nice Popup window for the user to edit the documentation.

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Visual Studio 2017 Extension development tutorial, Part 2: Add Menu Item

The previous blog post introduced the wonderful world of Visual Studio extensions.

Let’s start and do some coding. During the tutorial we are going to build a VS extensions called CodyDocs and place it on GitHub.

CodyDocs will save code documentation in a separate file and the extension will allow to view and edit the documentation in the editor itself.

In the first part, we’ll start with a simple “Hello World” program. We’ll create an extensions with a Menu item that does something. I’ll make things a bit more interesting and make the menu item act as a checkbox.

Starting the project

A great way to start any feature is to add a button to disable it. So first order of business: Add a checkable menu item to Enable and Disable the feature our extension performs.

First, we’ll create a new project with File -> New Project -> VSIX project and call it CodyDocs.

Now to be able to enable and disable the feature, we need the ability to store a bool value that stores our setting.

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Visual Studio 2017 Extension development tutorial, Part 1

Ever used Resharper, CodeMaid, WebEssentials, OzCode or CodeRush?

Those are pretty incredible tools, right?

Ever thought about developing an extensions for yourself and your team? Maybe a little something that edits the very difficult configuration files your company invented?
Or how about an extensions that automatically performs a localization merge?

There are a lot of advantages to in-house VS extensions and some big companies even have a dedicated team to work on in-house VS extensions. Extensions development is a very useful skill to have in your toolbox.

Working on OzCode, an awesome extension that helps debugging, I discovered a new world of knowledge. I’m going to write a series of blog posts introducing the wonderful world of VS extensibility.

So what can a VS extension do?

If you used Resharper or any other mentioned extension, you know the extension can do almost anything. Here are some examples:

  • Add commands to VS Menu.
  • Analyze code files with Roslyn.
  • Change code files and projects.

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Type (of) Design Challenge

A long time ago, on my first programming job I had a design problem that I couldn’t solve.
This problem haunted me. The reason was that it seemed so simple, and yet I couldn’t find a good solution for it.

Eventually I did a huge refactor, but instead of solving it correctly I simply changed one problem to another.

Recently, years later, in a different company, I came up with that great solution I was after.
So besides telling you I’m thinking about code from years ago way too much, I want to share with you my exciting great solution. Continue reading