Memory

.NET Healthy Memory Management

6 Best Practices to Keep a .NET Application’s Memory Healthy

Memory problems in a big .NET application are a silent killer of sorts. Kind of like high blood pressure. You can eat junk food for a long time ignoring it until one day you face a serious problem. In the case of a .NET program, that serious problem can be high memory consumption, major performance issues, and outright crashes. In this post, you’ll see how to keep our application’s blood pressure at healthy levels.

Memory profilers in .NET using for memory leaks

Demystifying Memory Profilers in C# .NET Part 2: Memory Leaks

Memory leaks are very common, hard to notice, and eventually, lead to devastating consequences. The main tool to detect and fix memory leaks is a Memory Profiler. In fact, I believe the most common usage of memory profilers in .NET is exactly for the purpose of fixing memory leaks. In this article, you’ll see exactly how to use memory profilers to find the leaky objects, why they are still referenced, and how to solve the problem.

Memory Profilers .NET

Demystifying Memory Profilers in C# .NET Part 1: The Principles

Memory leaks and GC Pressure cause pretty inconvenient effects like out-of-memory crashes, performance problems, and high memory consumption. Our primary tools when dealing with those issues are memory profilers. They are one of the most important category of tools in .NET troubleshooting, and in this article, you’ll see how to use them and extract the most information from them.

Reasons for memory leaks in .NET

8 Ways You can Cause Memory Leaks in .NET

Memory leaks are sneakily bad creatures. It’s easy to ignore them for a very long time, while they slowly destroy the application. With memory leaks, your memory consumption grows, creating GC pressure and performance problems. Finally, the program will just crash on an out-of-memory exception.